Aboriginal & Torres Strait

Some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander LGBTIQ, sistergirls, brotherboys and same-sex attracted people may experience exclusion or discrimination in their community, friendship or family networks when they disclose their gender diversity, sexuality or intersex. 

Others find that their families and communities are the best place for support.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people may face difficulties finding services that understand what they need and this may be more challenging if they are LGBTIQ.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a right to expect services to understand their needs whether they are specialist or mainstream.

There are a growing number of specialist Aboriginal and LGBTIQ services that can support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people impacted by violence. The LGBTIQ Domestic Violence Interagency is working closely with services and communities to improve a range of safe options for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander LGBTIQ, sistergirls, brotherboys and same-sex attracted people affected by violence.


'Outing' as a Method of Control

If the abused partner has not disclosed their sexuality, gender (identity, history or expression), intersex or HIV status to their family, friends, workmates or their cultural community the abusive partner may use 'outing' as a method of control.